Twin magazine issue XX

Issue 20 celebrates a landmark in Twin’s history: 10 years of championing women and emerging creativity. Fittingly, this issue is packed with interviews and contributors that embody our independent and boundary pushing spirit. Who more emblematic of that ethos than Katharine Hamnett? Her radical vision has consistently held power to account and advocated for sustainable values and the power of education. Or boxer Ramla Ali, who knocked out the idea that ‘women don’t box’ and became a champion – inside and outside of the ring. Both women shattered existing expectations to establish new rules of their own. Also in this issue, filmmaker Fenn O’Meally and poet Debris Stevenson talk feminism, community and creativity, dismantling the system one punchy takedown at a time. You’ll want to read this interview twice. These are the influencers of our times, but we’ve also asked leading creatives to talk about the icons who came before. Designers Michael Halpern, Mimi Wade and Art School’s Tom Barratt contribute loving family portraits of the women who originally inspired them.

This anniversary, community is key. In ‘Queens of Scampia’, photographer Jess Kohl offers an intimate portrait of the trans women in northern Naples, while Lotte van Raelte’s discusses her open, natural portraits of women’s bodies in all their unique wonder. Francesca Allen’s ‘Tokyo Girls’ is a love letter to women and the city, while back in Britain, artists Jeremy Deller talks Stonehenge and his collaboration with Aries. And with a similar nod to the pagan, photographer Steph Wilson’s ‘White Nightmare’ conjures surreal and weird world where the white male has been overpowered and the freakish and strange rule. Looking back to look forward, Philomena Epps reflects on the original contributed for our first issue, in the context of where we are now. “The Age of Aquarius will last for another 2000 years”, she says, “but will we?”

Given the innovative creatives that have helped to promote original thinking over Twin’s last 10 years, the answer is probably, yes. The range of talent that has helped to establish the magazine’s pioneering voice is a reason to be optimistic about the future. Here’s to a bright, bold and disruptive decade ahead.

Interview with Christy Turlington, H&M magazine

It’s midnight and we’re listening to the speaker phone ring 8,106 kilometres across the Atlantic, the whole of America and into Christy Turlington Burns’ office in California. We’re connected to one of fashion’s most influential names with a short introduction: ‘Christy’s on.’ As evenings go, this is an incomparable way to spend a night.

Read the full interview with Christy Turlington for H&M, here. 

‘In Paris, Street Style Disrupts the Fashion Hierarchy’, Culture Trip

It’s a funny time for French fashion. The city with the most traditional legacy finds itself facing disruption at every turn. Male creative directors are being replaced, social media is putting demands on craftsmanship and Macron has arrived with sweeping reforms. But on the streets of Paris SS18, the biggest change is afoot. Women are claiming a right to feed into the creative process and own how they dress. Culture Trip examines the subtle power shifts happening outside of the catwalk.Continue reading “‘In Paris, Street Style Disrupts the Fashion Hierarchy’, Culture Trip”

‘For the love of Cher’, Twin

Cher is a goddess. Her influence lurks in the ether, making appearances where you’d least expect them – in Mamma Mia 2, as the recommended video you didn’t know you wanted on YouTube. That’s just the start.

She’s the empowered, individual icon who brings eternal joy to ears and minds – look no further than her duet with Tina Turner, or her workout videos, if you’re in need of a refresh.

Inspired by vintage finds in Athens, stylist Daphne Iliaki began to bring together a 1970s-inspired shoot which drew on cowgirls and Cher. “I mainly researched 70s Cher for beauty references on hair” she explains, adding Anjelica Huston was also a point of  reference, and photographer Inez van Lamsweerde, “for her “witchy” hair”. 

“When you see a 70s Cher look, you can tell that what she did with designer Bob Mackie was free, authentic, fun and gave zero shits.  That’s the magic of it, that still feels unique and relevant today. Plus her charming boyish looks, combined with all that glitter ‘n’ glamour!”

Shot by photographer Nikos Papadopoulos and featuring Gucci model Veronika Primorac, the new series celebrates the iconic style of the 1970s, and Cher’s enduring spirit.

See the full feature on Twin.